The Human Factor in Aircraft Accidents by David Beaty

The Human Factor in Aircraft Accidents by David Beaty soon to be presented for sale on the sparkling BookLovers of Bath web site!

Published: London: The Scientific Book Club, 1969, Hardback in dust wrapper.

Illustrated by way of: Appendices [2]; Diagrams;

From the cover: Although considerable progress has been made in increasing the reliability of airplanes, very little has been accomplished in reducing the element of human error in aircraft accidents.

So said the first International Civil Aviation Organisations first volume of accident reports seventeen years ago. But in the interim the view that human error accidents are inevitable has prevailed. It is this view that David Beaty attacks in The Human Factor in Aircraft Accidents. Investigating into an almost totally unexplored area, he has related aircraft accidents to known psychological concepts of fatigue, perception, laterality, conflict, frustration, learning and decision-taking.

This book takes a cool scientific look at the whole problem. Not at all sensational, but none the less of exciting interest, it tells the stories of aircraft accidents and interprets them in psychological terms. And at the same time, it suggests the prospect that, if psychological factors were properly investigated and better understood, a considerable cut would be effected in the now, rising aircraft accident rate.

Introduction by: Captain C. C. Jackson

Very Good in Good Dust Wrapper. Unlaminated dust wrapper a little edgeworn and faded. Bruised at the tail of the spine. Pages lightly age-tanned with heavier offset to the endpapers.

Red boards with Black titling to the Spine. 185 pages. 8¾” x 5½”.

Of course, if you don’t like this one, may I spellbind you with a further miscellany hither or maybe further, hand picked, books in my Transport Air catalogue?

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About BookLovers of Bath

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