The Hundred in the Hands: Brave Eagle’s Account of the Fetterman Fight, 21st December 1866 by Paul & Dorothy Goble

The Hundred in the Hands: Brave Eagle’s Account of the Fetterman Fight, 21st December 1866 by Paul & Dorothy Goble newly listed for sale on the fantastic BookLovers of Bath web site!

Published: Macmillan, 1972, Hardback in dust wrapper.

Illustrated by way of: Colour Drawings;

From the cover: In 1866 the U. S. Government sent a commission to Fort Laramie in an attempt to negotiate with the Indians the right to open the Bozeman Trail, the shortest route to the gold fields of the West. This route was in the midst of Indian territory and would cut right through the heart of the buffalo grazing lands essential to Indian survival. Red Cloud chief of the Oglala Sioux and many Cheyenne chiefs were determined to keep the trail closed. Six months after the Commission had declared the trail safe, having negotiated with only a few minor tribes, the Army suffered its worst defeat at the hands of the Indians in a battle known as The Fetterman Fight, called by the Indians the Battle of the Hundred in the Hands.

Told from the Indian point of view, THE HUNDRED IN THE HANDS describes the event in which Captain Fettermans entire command of 82 men were killed by overwhelming numbers of Sioux and Cheyenne led by Red Cloud. The material is historically accurate and the pictures take their inspiration from Plains Indian paintings of the period 1860-1900.

Very Good in Good Dust Wrapper. Gently bruised at the spine ends and corners with commensurate wear to the dust wrapper which is nicked at the top corner of the upper panel, head of the spine and a little soiled overall. Text complete, clean and tight.

Matching Pictorial boards. 58 pages. Bibliography. 10¾” x 8¼”.

Of course, if you don’t like this one, may I tempt with you something from here?

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