Transport in Britain 1750-2000: from Canal Lock to Gridlock by Philip Bagwell & Peter Lyth

Transport in Britain 1750-2000: from Canal Lock to Gridlock by Philip Bagwell & Peter Lyth newly listed for sale on the fantastic BookLovers of Bath web site!Hamlbedon and London, 2002, Hardback in dust wrapper.

Illustrated by way of: Black & White Photographs; Tables;

From the cover: Transport in Britain: From Canal Lock to Gridlock is a complete history of a fascinating and highly important subject. It covers all the major forms of transport, from the horse to the aeroplane, setting them in their historical context. It highlights long-term themes in Britains transport history, looks at the dilemmas facing todays society and suggests possible solutions.

Britains history has been and still is a history of its transport. The Industrial Revolution, which made Britain the Workshop of the World and underpinned its empire, was made possible by the improved roads and new canals of the eighteenth century, and by the railway network of the nineteenth. As cities grew, transport continued to be central to Britains economy, yet its infrastructure became steadily inadequate. Faced by too many cars in too small an area, and by an urgent need to spend vast sums to modernise the public system, transport has now become one of the most pressing and controversial issues of our time.

Very Good in Very Good Dust Wrapper.

Blue boards with Gilt titling to the Spine. [XV] 272 pages. Index. Bibliography. 9½” x 6¼”.

Of course, if you don’t like this one, may I tempt with you something from here?

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