The History of the Melton Mowbray Pork Pie by Trevor Hickman

The History of the Melton Mowbray Pork Pie by Trevor Hickman lands on the |> SALE <| shelves in my shop.

Sutton Publishing, 2005, Paperback.

2nd (revised) edition, 1st printing, [First Published: 1997] Illustrated by way of: Black & White Photographs; Facsimiles; Maps [1];

From the cover: IN 1831, Edward Adcock began wholesaling his Melton Mowbray pork pie in London. He made use of the daily Leeds to London stagecoach to convey his pies to the city centre. In 1840 Enoch Evans set up a rival business, and the fame of the pork pie began to spread. The opening of the Nottingham to Peterborough railway in 1847, and the building of Melton Mowbray station, further encouraged the pies development. A number of specialist bakehouses were commissioned, and one of these specialists was John Dickinson. In the late 1840s, Dickinson started making pies close to the station in Melton Mowbray. In 1851 he leased a shop for the business on Nottingham Street, and there the Melton Mowbray pork pie is still made today. This book is highly illustrated with a fine collection of

photographs, and offers the reader a fascinating record of the people and places associated with the development and production of this famous foodstuff.

Near Fine.

158 pages. 9¾” x 6¾”.

This book will be listed, sooner or later, for £6.50 on my delightful website… (added to my Industry Food category.) but get 50% off buying from my blog… below…

BUY NOW FOR £3.25 + P&P!

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