The Lost Boy by Alberto Arbasino

Published by Faber & Faber, 1964, Hardback in Dust Wrapper. 1st Ed.

Condition: Very Good in Good Dust Wrapper. Unlaminated dust wrapper a little edgeworn and faded with tape reinforcements to the tail of the spine and top corner of the upper panel. Edges of the text block lightly tanned. Leans a little. Tan stripe to the rear blank. Text complete, clean and tight.

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From the cover: So far the only work of the young Italian author Alberto Arbasino to appear in English has been short stories published in The London Magazine and in Italian Stories of Today edited by John Lehmann. In The Lost Boy he shows himself to be an original experimental novelist who has rediscovered the wit, humour and sophistication which was characteristic of much Italian literature in the late eighteenth century as well as the romantic passion of the operas and melodramas of the early nineteenth. The protagonist, who is also the narrator, describes the vicissitudes of a homosexual infatuation and discusses, as he does so, the problems of how to write the story. And, as Signer Arbasino is interested not only in the Italian tradition, but also in the whole field of contemporary European and American literature, the problem of how to write this particular story expands into an extensive inquiry into the problems of the contemporary writer in general.

Angus Wilson has recently described Alberto Arbasino as the youngest and cleverest of all the Italian critics of today The Lost Boy, which was written in 1955, reveals that he is also a creative writer of considerable significance.

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